bike wheel animation by katy beveridge




katy beveridge creates animations by the spinning of paper cutouts fixed inside the wheels of a bicycle


by assembling paper cutouts into the wheels of bicycles, london-based graphic designer katy beveridge
creates a zoetrope-- the spinning devices that typically produce the illusion of a moving animation from a series of static pictures.

interestingly, this zoetrope effect can only captured on film; to the naked eye, the movement of the wheels
occurs too quickly and is perceived as a blur. captured frame by frame, however, beveridge's snowflake-like designs
produce captivating animated visual effects that mimic bobbling gears, growing plumes, and other abstract forms.



video footage of the bicycle zoetrope



view of the bicycles with designs



full view of bike wheel



early test video, with moving images placed along the tires


via thenextweb


저작자 표시
신고
Posted by Yangshung

Interview: Wim Crouwel at the Design Museum 1 from Dezeen on Vimeo.



Interview: Wim Crouwel at the Design Museum 2 from Dezeen on Vimeo.




저작자 표시
신고
Posted by Yangshung

The Turbulent Gravity Wheel (Fashion Performance by Joost Jansen) from Justyna Perlinska on Vimeo.


저작자 표시
신고
Posted by Yangshung

Dutch_Design_Week from Alen Vukovic on Vimeo.



저작자 표시
신고
Posted by Yangshung

YOHJI YAMAMOTO: THIS IS MY DREAM from Huge Conglomerate on Vimeo.



저작자 표시
신고
Posted by Yangshung
kei kagami: 10 years retrospective of a shoemaker




kei kagami 10 year retrospective
autumn/winter 2002, private collection

all images courtesy steinbeisser and the lloyd hotel


a 10 year retrospective of london-based japanese shoe designer kei kagami curated by steinbeisser is now on display at
the lloyd hotel & cultural embassy in amsterdam. the exhibition is an encompassing a display of kagami and
his design partner yoshi yamakuwa's unique relationship with their varied media and materials. kagami, a classically trained architect,
worked with japan's kenzo tange before refocusing his craft to fashion. his body of work has a highly structured and experimental quality,
influenced by his experience in architecture and also due to his work with radical fashion icon john galliano.
each of the 60 pairs of hand-crafted shoes featured in the installation are conceptual, wearable, art work. the exhibition is
open now until december 2nd.

 


spring/summer 2011, for sale

 


autumn/winter 2005, private collection

 


autumn/winter 2008, for sale




autumn/winter 2004, private collection



autumn/winter 2005, private collection



spring/summer 2011, private collection



spring/summer 2004, private collection



spring/summer 2007, private collection

 


autumn/winter 2002, private collection



spring/summer 2011, private collection




spring/summer 2005, private collection


저작자 표시
신고
Posted by Yangshung

stefan sagmeister for lobmeyr




'seven deadly sins - seven heavenly virtues' drinking glasses by stefan sagmeister (view from the top)
image courtesy lobmeyr

vienna-based glass and chandelier producer J. & L. lobmeyr celebrates the 80th anniversary of austrian designer adolf loos's
legendary no. 248 bar set. the cylindrical glass tumbler, considered to be provocatively simple at its conception,
has been produced by lobmeyr ever since.

in may 1931, in a letter to lobmeyr, adolf loos suggested to eventually replace his original geometric patterns with motifs
on the base, such as 'butterflies, small animals, and the nude human form' - an unusual proposal to be made by a purist.
today, 80 years later, austrian born, new york-based graphic designer stefan sagmeister has expanded this idea and included
illustrations of the seven deadly sins (black) and the seven heavenly virtues (clear) on the bottom of each glass. the images
will emerge as a little surprise as you empty the glass.
the new interpretation of the no. 248 bar set are presented during
vienna design week 2011. if you happen to be in vienna, please visit lobmeyr for the presentation tonight at 7pm.



detail of 'seven deadly sins - seven heavenly virtues'
image courtesy lobmeyr (detail)

lobmeyr is part of the most wonderful austrian craft tradition, practicing the very highest level of engraving, hand-painting
and printing on glass anywhere in the world. it is simply delightful, also being austrian myself, to be able to work with them.

in his letter to lobmeyr in may 1931, adolf loos requested to eventually replace the original geometric patterns with 'butterflies,
small animals and the nude human form" on the bottom of the glasses. we picked up on this concept and expanded it with the use
of the seven deadly sins/heavenly virtues which allowed us to incorporate illustrations and have the possibility to start a discussion
about good and evil at the dinner table. this was good.

the glass shape with the heavy bottom lent itself wonderfully to display graphic icons, ... when you drink red wine,
the images
will emerge as a little surprise as you empty the glass.
it is nice to be surprised by a pair of beautiful breasts.

says stefan sagmeister in an interview with editor james gaddy



image courtesy lobmeyr (detail)


the black bottom shows illustrations that reflect the 'seven deadly sins'
image © designboom


meanwhile the glasses with the clear bottom show the 'seven heavenly virtues'
image © designboom



the original no. 248 tumbler by adolf loos has a geometric pattern on the bottom
image courtesy lobmeyr




the original no. 248 bar set by adolf loos celebrates its 80th anniversary
image courtesy lobmeyr



at the entrance of the lobmeyr store there are panels showing the photgraphic icons that stefan sagmeister has chosen for the original no. 248 bar set by adolf loos
image © designboom


inside the lobmeyr store
image © designboom





letter (22.5.1931) from adolf loos to lobmeyr, suggesting new motifs for the no. 248 bar set (sorry, german language only)
image
courtesy lobmeyr





저작자 표시
신고
Posted by Yangshung
Tales of the Hunt: Kwangho Lee


In this movie by Brussels gallerist Victor Hunt, Korean designer Kwangho Lee explains how growing up on a farm outside Seoul has influenced his work. The movie is part of a series of interviews called Tales of the Hunt.

Lee is best known for his furniture and lighting woven from garden hoses and electrical cables, or cut from polystyrene foam with a hot wire. See more of his work on Dezeen here.

저작자 표시
신고
Posted by Yangshung
100 Years After the Party by Makiko Nakamura


100 Years After the Party by Makiko Nakamura

London Design Festival 2011: London designer Makiko Nakamura will exhibit a tea set engulfed in flowers and foliage at Tent London during the London Design Festival next month.

100 Years After the Party by Makiko Nakamura

Called 100 Years After the Party, the series is inspired by a story Nakamura tells about a tea service left behind at the end of civilisation.

100 Years After the Party by Makiko Nakamura

In the story, seeds land on the disintegrating porcelain by chance 100 years later, consuming the pieces in flowers.

100 Years After the Party by Makiko Nakamura

Tent London will take place from 22 to 25 September at the Old Truman Brewery, Brick Lane, London, E1 6QL, UK.

100 Years After the Party by Makiko Nakamura

Check out Dezeen’s plans for the London Design Festival here.

100 Years After the Party by Makiko Nakamura

Here some more details from Tent London:


Makiko Nakamura is a ceramic artist and designer based in London, and “What a wonderful world!” is a slogan of her creation. She has worked with ceramics in both art and design, making narrative one-off art pieces that have fantasy stories behind them. In addition, she has enjoyed making tableware that focuses on function, form and design. In the both types of works, Makiko combines sophistication and humor.

100 Years After the Party by Makiko Nakamura

Anthology of daydream stories – 100 Years After The Party

Makiko creates her works from stories she generated with some inspiration and her works also play a role as media to approach the stories behind them.

100 Years After the Party by Makiko Nakamura

One hundred years after the party, all the luxury furniture and ornaments in the room have rotten and moulded, and only porcelain tea set has been left. Gorgeous gold paint on the tea set has been washed away by rain and the tea set was absolutely lonely and miserable.

100 Years After the Party by Makiko Nakamura

But on the day, one hundred years after the party, it is nothing short of a miraculous, beautiful bird dropping the seed on the tea set.

100 Years After the Party by Makiko Nakamura

Then, leaves and germs come out and flowers bloom on it. The tea set has got a new life and not lonely anymore.

Happily ever after…

저작자 표시
신고
Posted by Yangshung
Watch Sculptures: Moments in Time by Dominic Wilcox

Watch sculptures - Moments in Time by Dominic Wilcox

London Design Festival 2011: a watch featuring a looter running off with a TV while a riot policeman stands and watches is one of a series of one-off, customised time pieces commissioned by Dezeen from Dominic Wilcox. Update: watch an interview with Wilcox on Dezeen Screen.

Watch Sculptures: Moments in Time by Dominic Wilcox

The series of seven sculptures, each featuring tiny, hand-crafted figures attached to the watch hands, will be exhibited at Dezeen Space in Shoreditch, London from 17 September to 16 October.

Watch sculptures - Moments in Time by Dominic Wilcox

The Looter watch was inspired by the recent riots in London, which Wilcox witnessed first hand. Wilcox says: “I had to walk across Mare Street in Hackney to get home during the riots. I remember seeing a boy carrying an LCD TV down a back street. I noticed how the police seemed unsure how to react, holding their  circular shields while the boy held a rectangular TV.”

Watch sculptures - Moments in Time by Dominic Wilcox

The series also features a watch with a man so engrossed in his iPhone that he fails to notice an incredible feat of balance and strength occurring right next to him; and another with a young girl trying to stop a butcher killing a floating pig.

Watch sculptures - Moments in Time by Dominic Wilcox

Each sculpture is a unique piece, based on a vintage watch and protected by a glass dome. The watches will be on sale for £500 + VAT = £600 each at Dezeen Space, at 54 Rivington Street, London EC2A 3QN.

Watch sculptures - Moments in Time by Dominic Wilcox

See all our stories about Dominic Wilcox, including coat hooks made from paint-encrusted brushes and a nose-mounted device that allows you to use your smartphone while in the bath.

Watch sculptures - Moments in Time by Dominic Wilcox

Above: London Looter. “A hooded youth sprints away with a 42 inch LCD TV while a riot policeman looks on.”

Watch sculptures - Moments in Time by Dominic Wilcox

Above: The unrequited handshake. “The outstretched hand of friendship is continually rejected.”

Watch sculptures - Moments in Time by Dominic Wilcox

Above: Rest time. “A brief moment to sit.”

Watch sculptures - Moments in Time by Dominic Wilcox

Above: A man, engrossed in his iphone, is oblivious to the monkey balanced on the head of a weightlifting boy who stands on the arm of an elderly rollerskater. “That is the title.”

Watch sculptures - Moments in Time by Dominic Wilcox

Above: Adventures of a young vegetarian OR Pigs shall fly. “A small girl attempts to stop a butcher chopping up a pig by hanging on his arm while the pig floats away.”

Watch sculptures - Moments in Time by Dominic Wilcox

Above: Hide n seek. “A pig tailed girl hides behind a tree from a searching boy.”

Watch sculptures - Moments in Time by Dominic Wilcox

Above: Watch sweeper. “The numbers and hands of a watch are swept away by a watch sweeper.”

Here’s some text from Wilcox:


Watch sculptures: Moments in time by Dominic Wilcox

Dominic Wilcox has created a series of miniature time-based sculptures using a collection of vintage watches and customised model figures. By attaching tiny figures onto the second and minute hands of each watch, Wilcox has made unique, animated scenes from everyday observations and imagined situations.

Watch sculptures - Moments in Time by Dominic Wilcox

Background info

Last September I undertook a project called Speed Creating (shown at the Anti design festival) where I made a new creative thing each day for 30 days. It was during that time that I came up with the idea of attaching figures onto the hands of watches. I decided I should take more time developing the idea so made the decision not to use it in the Speed Creating project.

Watch sculptures - Moments in Time by Dominic Wilcox

Eight months later I showed a prototype to the people at Dezeen and they commissioned me to create a collection of these watch sculptures for September. I wanted to create a series of scenes and fleeting moments both observed and imagined. Playing with the idea of unending repetition.

Watch sculptures - Moments in Time by Dominic Wilcox

The miniature figure on the second hand moves around constantly and the figure on the minute hand appears stationary. I spent time thinking about the relationship between the two people, how one passes another repeatedly and I tried to think about when that situation happens in real life or in an imagined scenario.

Watch sculptures - Moments in Time by Dominic Wilcox

I altered head and arm angles of found model figures and made objects such as the LCD tv with wire and plug. The glass domes are hand blown to fit each watch exactly.

Watch sculptures - Moments in Time by Dominic Wilcox



저작자 표시
신고
Posted by Yangshung


티스토리 툴바